Home > Relevant Research, To-Do List > Relevant References for the ODP

Relevant References for the ODP

Scelidosaurus

Olde Timey Restoration of Scelidosaurus, after Marsh

In response to a recent query on this blog, ODPer Christian Foth contributed a list of papers potentially relevant to the ODP, specifically limb posture and evolution in ornithischian dinosaurs. It’s important to recognize work that others did before and see how it relates to ours. Furthermore, a good reference list is essential for the upcoming manuscript.

What can you do?

If you think of another paper that might be added to the list (within reason, of course), drop a line in the comments section. If you are interested in providing a summary of a certain paper as a guest blog post (either here or at your own blog), that would be great, too. As always, one need not be a Ph.D’ed scientist to apply! We’re just looking for a short summary.

For my part, I added the Middleton and Gatesy reference – although it deals with theropods, I think some of the background info and analytical methods are quite relevant. Hmm. . .that might be a good one to blog about.

Reference List in Progress

Alexander R. 1985. Mechanics of posture and gait of some large dinosaurs. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 83: 1-25.
Bakker RT. 1968. The superiority of dinosaurs. Discovery 3 (2): 11-22.
Biewener (1983). Allometry of quadrupedal locomotion: the scaling of duty factor, bone curvature and limb orientation to body size. J. Exp. Biol. 105: 147-171.
Bonnan MF & P Senter. 2007. Were the basal sauropodomorph dinosaurs Plateosaurus and Massospondylus habitual quadropeds. Special Papers in Palaeontology 77: 139–155
Bonnan, MF, & AM Yates. 2007. A new description of the forelimb of the basal sauropodomorph Melanorosaurus: implications for the evolution of pronation, manus shape and quadrupedalism in sauropod dinosaurs. pp. 157-168 in: Paul M. Barrett and David J. Batten (eds.), Special Papers in Palaeontology 77: Evolution and Palaeobiology of Early Sauropodomorph Dinosaurs. The Palaeontological Association, U.K.
Bultynck P (1992) An assessment of posture and gait in Iguanodon bernissartensis Boulenger, 1881. Bulletin de l’Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belgique: Sciences de la Terre 63: 5-11.
Carrano MT. 2000. Homoplasy and the evolution of dinosaur locomotion. Paleobiology 26 (3): 489-512.
Carrano MT (2001) Implications of limb bone scaling, curvature and eccentricity in mammals and non-avian dinosaurs. Journal of Zoology 254: 41-55.
Dilkes DW. 2000. Appendicular myology of the hadrosaurian dinosaur Maiasaura peeblesorum from the Late Cretaceous (Campanian) of Montana. Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Earth Sciences 90: 87-125.
Dilkes DW. 2001. An ontogenetic perspective on locomotion in the Late Cretaceous dinosaur Maiasaura peeblesorum (Ornithischia: Hadrosauridae). Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 38: 1205-1227.
Dodson, P & JO Farlow. 1997. The forelimb carriage of ceratopsid dinosaurs. DinoFest International Proceedings 393-398.
Galton PM. 1970. The posture of hadrosaurian dinosaurs. Journal of Paleontology 44 (3): 464-473.
Garstka WR & DA Burnham. 1997. Posture and stance of Triceratops. Evidence of digitigrade manus and cantilever vertebral column. DinoFest International Proceedings 385-391.
Heinrich DE, Bruff CB & DB Weishampel. 1993. Femoral ontogeny and locomotor biomechanics of Dryosaurus lettowvorbecki (Dinosauria, Iguanodontia). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 108: 179-196.
Hutchinson JR. 2004. Biomechanical modeling and sensitivity analysis of bipedal running ability. I. Extant taxa. Journal of Morphology 262: 421-440.
Johnson RE, Ostrom JH (1995) The forelimb of Torosaurus and an analysis of the posture and gait of ceratopsian dinosaurs. In: Thomason JJ, editor. Functional Morphology in Vertebrate Paleontology. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 205-218.
Kilbourne BM & PJ Makovicky. 2010. Limb bone allometry during postnatal ontogeny in non-avian dinosaurs. Journal of Anatomy 217: 135-152.
Kubo T & MJ Benton. 2007. Evolution of hindlimb posture in archosaurs: limb streeses in extinct vertebrates. Palaeontology 50 (6): 1519-1529.
Lee DV & SG Meek 2005. Directionally compliant legs influence the intrinsic pitch behaviour of a trotting quadroped. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 272(1563): 567–572.
Mallinson. 2010. CAD assessment of the posture and range of motion of Kentrosaurus aethiopicus Hennig 1915. Swiss J Geosci 103: 211-233.
McMahon, T (1975) Allometry and biomechanics: Limb bones in adult Ungulates. Am. Nat. 109:547-563.
Middleton KM & S Gatesy. 2000. Theropod forelimb design and evolution. Z J Linn Soc 128: 149-187
Organ CL. 2006. Biomechnics of ossified tendons in ornithopod dinosaurs. Paleobiology 31 (4): 652-665.
Papantoniou V, Avlakiotis P & R Alexander. 1999. Control of a robit dinosaur. Phil.Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B 354: 863-868.
Paul GS & P Christiansen. 2000. Forelimb posture in neoceratopsian dinosaurs: implications for gait and locomotion. Paleobiology, 26 (3): 450–465.
Romer AS. 1923. The ilium in dinosaurs and birds. Bulletin American Museum of Natural Histroy 48: 141-145.
Raichlen DA. 2006. Effects of limb mass distribution on mechanical power outputs during quadrupedalism. The Journal of Experimental Biology 209: 633-644
Romer AS. 1927. The pelvic musculature of ornithischian dinosaurs. Acta Zoologica 8: 225-275.
Sellers WI & PL Manning. 2007. Estimating dinosaur maximum running speeds using evolutionary robotics. Proceedings of Royal Society B 274: 2711-2716.
Senter P. 2007. Analysis of forelimb function in basal ceratopsians. Journal of Zoology 273: 305-314.
Sternberg CM. 1965. New restoration of hadrosaurian dinosaur. National Museum of Canada, Natural History Papers 1-5.
Taylor CR. 1978. Why change gaits? Recruitment of muscles and muscle fibers as a function of speed and gait. American Zoologist 18: 153.161.
Tereshchenko VS. 1994. A reconstruction of the erect posture of Protoceratops. Paleontological Journal 28 (1): 104-119.
Tereshchenko VS. 1996. A reconstruction of the locomotion of Protoceratops. Paleontological Journal 30 (2): 232-245.
Tereshchenko VS. 2008. Adaptive features of protoceratopoids (Ornithischia: Neoceratposia). Paleontological Journal 42 (3): 273-286.
Thompson S & R Holmes. Forelimb stance and step cycle in Chasmosaurus irvenenesis (Dinosauria: Neoceratopsia). Palaeontologica Electronica 10 (1): 5A.
Thulborn RA. 1982. Speeds and gaits of dinosaurs. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 38: 227-256.
Thulborn RA. 1984. Preferred gaits of bipedal dinosaurs. Alcheringa 8 (3): 243-252.
Yates, Adam M., Matthew F. Bonnan, Johann Neveling, A. Chinsamy and Marc G. Blackbeard. 2009. A new transitional sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Early Jurassic of South Africa and the evolution of sauropod feeding and quadrupedalism. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, published online. doi:10.1098/rspb.2009.1440

 

  • Alexander R. 1985. Meachanics of posture and gait of some large dinosaurs. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 83: 1-25.

  • Bakker RT. 1968. The superiority of dinosaurs. Discovery 3 (2): 11-22.

  • Bonnan MF & P Senter. 2007. Were the basal sauropodomorph dinosaurs Plateosaurus and Massospondylus habitual quadropeds. Special Papers in Palaeontology 77: 139–155

  • Carrano MT. 2000. Homoplasy and the evolution of dinosaur locomotion. Paleobiology 26 (3): 489-512.

  • Dilkes DW. 2000. Apendicular myology of the hadrosaurian dinosaur Maiasaura peeblesorum from the Late Cretaceous (Campanian) of Montana. Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Earth Sciences 90: 87-125.

  • Dilkes DW. 2001. An ontogenetic perspective on locomotion in the Late Cretaceous dinosaur Maiasaura peeblesorum (Ornithischia: Hadrosauridae). Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 38: 1205-1227.

  • Dodson, P & JO Farlow. 1997. The forelimb carriage of ceratopsid dinosaurs. DinoFest International Proceedings 393-398.

  • Galton PM. 1970. The posture of hadrosaurian dinosaurs. Journal of Paleontology 44 (3): 464-473.

  • Garstka WR & DA Burnham. 1997. Psoture and stance of Triceratops. Evidence of digitigrade manus and cantilever vertebral column. DinoFest International Proceedings 385-391.

  • Heinrich DE, Bruff CB & DB Weishampel. 1993. Femoral ontogeny and locomotor biomechanics of Dryosaurus lettowvorbecki (Dinosauria, Iguanodontia). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 108: 179-196.

  • Hutchinson JR. 2004. Biomechanical modeling and sensitivity analysis of bipedal running ability. I. Extant taxa. Journal of Morphology 262: 421-440.

  • Kilbourne BM & PJ Maklovicky. 2010. Limb bone allometry during postnatal ontogeny in non-avian dinosaurs. Journal of Anatomy 217: 135-152.

  • Kubo T & MJ Benton. 2007. Evolution of hindlimb posture in archosaurs: limb streeses in extinct vertebrates. Palaeontology 50 (6): 1519-1529.

  • Lee DV & SG Meek 2005. Directionally compliant legs influence the intrinsic pitch behaviour of a trotting quadroped. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 272(1563): 567–572.

  • Mallinson. 2010. CAD assessment of the posture and range of motion of Kentrosaurus aethiopicus Hennig 1915. Swiss J Geosci 103: 211-233.

  • Organ CL. 2006. Biomechnics of ossified tendons in ornithopod dinosaurs. Paleobiology 31 (4): 652-665.

  • Papantoniou V, Avlakiotis P & R Alexander. 1999. Control of a robit dinosaur. Phil.Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B 354: 863-868.

  • Paul GS & P Christiansen. 2000. Forelimb posture in neoceratopsian dinosaurs: implications for gait and locomotion. Paleobiology, 26 (3): 450–465.

  • Romer AS. 1923. The ilium in dinosaurs and birds. Bulletin American Museum of Natural Histroy 48: 141-145.

  • Raichlen DA. 2006. Effects of limb mass distribution on mechanical power outputs during quadrupedalism. The Journal of Experimental Biology 209: 633-644

  • Romer AS. 1927. The pelvic musculature of ornithischian dinosaurs. Acta Zoologica 8: 225-275.

  • Sellers WI & PL Manning. 2007. Estimating dinosaur maximum running speeds using evolutionary robotics. Proceedings of Royal Society B 274: 2711-2716.

  • Senter P. 2007. Analysis of forelimb function in basal ceratopsians. Journal of Zoology 273: 305-314.

  • Sternberg CM. 1965. New restoration of hadrosaurian dinosaur. National Museum of Canada, Natural History Papers 1-5.

  • Taylor CR. 1978. Why change gaits? Recruitment of muscles and muscle fibers as a function of speed and gait. American Zoologist 18: 153.161.

  • Tereshchenko VS. 1994. A reconstruction of the erect posture of Protoceratops. Paleontological Journal 28 (1): 104-119.

  • Tereshchenko VS. 1996. A reconstruction of the locomotion of Protoceratops. Paleontological Journal 30 (2): 232-245.

  • Tereshchenko VS. 2008. Adaptive features of protoceratopoids (Ornithischia: Neoceratposia). Paleontological Journal 42 (3): 273-286.

  • Thompson S & R Holmes. Forelimb stance and step cycle in Chasmosaurus irvenenesis (Dinosauria: Neoceratopsia). Palaeontologica Electronica 10 (1): 5A.

  • Thulborn RA. 1982. Speeds and gaits of dinosaurs. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 38: 227-256.

  • Thulborn RA. 1984. Preferred gaits of bipedal dinosaurs. Alcheringa 8 (3): 243-252.

About these ads
  1. November 15, 2010 at 9:10 am

    Possibly relevant:

    Bonnan, Matthew F., and Adam M. Yates. 2007. A new description of the forelimb of the basal sauropodomorph _Melanorosaurus_: implications for the evolution of pronation, manus shape and quadrupedalism in sauropod dinosaurs. pp. 157-168 in: Paul M. Barrett and David J. Batten (eds.), Special Papers in Palaeontology 77: Evolution and Palaeobiology of Early Sauropodomorph Dinosaurs. The Palaeontological Association, U.K.

    Yates, Adam M., Matthew F. Bonnan, Johann Neveling, A. Chinsamy and Marc G. Blackbeard. 2009. A new transitional sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Early Jurassic of South Africa and the evolution of sauropod feeding and quadrupedalism. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, published online. doi:10.1098/rspb.2009.1440

  2. John Dziak
    November 15, 2010 at 3:35 pm

    How about:
    Biewener (1983). Allometry of quadrupedal locomotion: the scaling of duty factor,
    bone curvature and limb orientation to body size. J. Exp. Biol. 105: 147-171. http://jeb.biologists.org/cgi/reprint/105/1/147.pdf

    McMahon, T (1975) Allometry and biomechanics: Limb bones in adult Ungulates. Am. Nat. 109:547-563.

    http://www.jstor.org/stable/2459811

    These are very mammalian though.

  3. Rob Taylor
    November 15, 2010 at 5:26 pm

    This might be one to add:

    Carrano MT (2001) Implications of limb bone scaling, curvature and eccentricity in mammals and non-avian dinosaurs. Journal of Zoology 254: 41-55.

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1017/S0952836901000541/abstract

  4. November 16, 2010 at 12:16 am

    Whenever the manuscript is in preparation I would be happy to contribute a short paragraph (or more or less, depending on what the lead authors envision) putting the crowdsourcing method of ODP in the context of similar approaches and their rising popularity across many fields of research. This is not the main message of the paper, but readers are likely to be interested in the unconventional methodology.

  5. November 16, 2010 at 12:36 am

    Jay, we like this idea and happily accept your offer. Please don’t feel any need to artificially restrict this to a single paragraph: part of the reason we’re planning to send to PLoS ONE is that there are no length restrictions, so we will write the paper to be exactly the right length; that should apply to your bit of it, too.

    Do check Taylor et al. (2010) and make sure that you cover any relevant stuff that we touched on there:

    http://www.miketaylor.org.uk/dino/pubs/taylor-et-al-2010/TaylorEtAl2010-open-dinosaur-project.pdf

  6. Rob Taylor
    November 16, 2010 at 4:56 am

    Two more titles that might potentially be of interest:

    Bultynck P (1992) An assessment of posture and gait in Iguanodon bernissartensis Boulenger, 1881. Bulletin de l’Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belgique: Sciences de la Terre 63: 5-11.

    Johnson RE, Ostrom JH (1995) The forelimb of Torosaurus and an analysis of the posture and gait of ceratopsian dinosaurs. In: Thomason JJ, editor. Functional Morphology in Vertebrate Paleontology. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 205-218.

  7. Andy Farke
    November 16, 2010 at 5:16 am

    Got ‘em added to the list!
    @Jay – you can probably write this at any time. I would Mike’s comments, too.

  8. Chris Noto
    November 16, 2010 at 4:20 pm

    Would there be any interest in creating an Endnote library file to smooth the writing process? I will do it if there’s interest. It’s something that can be easily shared and (I think) imported to other reference manger programs.

  9. November 16, 2010 at 4:30 pm

    My main priority is revising a manuscript right now but I’ll get to writing the citizen science section of ODP after that (in a couple weeks likely). The references I’ll use are in my Endnote library, and I’d be happy to send a library file with those references, I just don’t know who to send it to or how to send it. Should I e-mail it to you, Andy? It’ll make manuscript revisions much cleaner if all of the references are in an Endnote file, like Chris said.

    And of course, others are free to suggest changes to whatever I write about citizen science, crowdsourcing, etc. I can’t contribute much intellectually to the dinosaur aspect of this project (I’m an insect guy – things with bones are weird to me), but the citizen science part I can certainly help with.

  10. William Miller
    November 17, 2010 at 12:45 am

    It’s kind of theory-heavy compared to what the ODP is doing, and old (1970s), but:

    Coombs, Walter P. Theoretical aspects of cursorial adaptations in dinosaurs. The Quarterly Review of Biology Vol. 53, No. 4 (Dec., 1978), pp. 393-418

    might be helpful.

  11. William Miller
    November 17, 2010 at 12:46 am

    Can’t edit comments, sorry: Jstor link is http://www.jstor.org/stable/2826581 for those with access.

  12. Christian Foth
    November 21, 2010 at 10:16 am

    Further relevant references:

    Coombs WP. 1978. Forelimb muscles of Ankylosauria (Reptilia, Ornithischia). Journal of Paleontology 52 (3): 642-657.

    Coombs WP. 1978. Osteology and Myology of the hindlimb in the Ankylosauria (Reptilia, Ornithischia). Journal of Paleontology 53 (3): 666-684.

  13. November 23, 2010 at 9:40 am

    Also, Phil Senter recently published two papers on, respectively, a stegosaur and an ankylosaur specimen to demonstrate that their mani should have a sauropod-like configuration (Acta Palaeont Polonica, [?] in press). Whilst this probably alter the intermembral ratios generated for (at least) Thyreophora, the mode of locomotion may be called into question… lumbering “elephants” of the mesozoic instead of charging “rhinos”??

    In addition, I vaguely remember there is a recent paper trying to give a verdict on ceratopsian locomotion – not sprawning, but not so erect – yet I could not trace it out.

    Anyway, truly like to see ODP back to action!

  14. December 2, 2010 at 10:06 pm

    Fellow ODPers,

    As promised, I have written a paragraph putting the openness of the ODP project in the context of other citizen science approaches. This paragraph, like almost everything with our project, is open to suggestions. I would imagine that it would be modified somewhat depending on the surrounding text in the final manuscript. For example, maybe part of this paragraph will be split off and put into the Methods section and expanded upon to describe the steps involved in the project. Or maybe the whole paragraph isn’t what Andy et al are looking for, in which case scrap it without remorse. I can e-mail an Endnote file with the references to whichever of the main organizers wants it for the writing stage.

    Jay

    PARAGRAPH ON THE ODP IN THE CONTEXT OF CITIZEN SCIENCE:
    Our project is not unusual in its reliance upon open contributions from non-professionals, but it is unusual in the extent of its openness. A growing number of scientific projects rely upon contributions from non-professionals. These projects are called citizen science projects, and they cover a diversity of subjects (reviewed in Silvertown, 2009). Public contributions to citizen science projects are often restricted within narrow boundaries (e.g., classifying pictures of galaxies according to their shape for GalaxyZoo at http://www.galazyzoo.org, or providing bird observation data for eBird at ebird.org). These projects in which citizens contribute data provide great data sets for science and attract large numbers of volunteers motivated by contributing to real research on issues important to them (Evans et al., 2005; Lawrence, 2009; Hand, 2010; Krebs, 2010). Participants in these types of projects are often well-educated (e.g., Evans et al., 2005), capable of scientific thinking (Trumbull et al., 2000), and want to learn more about the “behind-the-scenes” analyses and interpretation of their data (Krebs, 2010). We believe, as do others (Lakshminarayanan, 2007; Stodden, 2010), that there are also opportunities for projects in which the citizens take on roles more deserving of the term ‘citizen scientists,’ participating not only in data collection but also coming up with questions and interpreting data. Projects with greater complexity in contribution possibilities will likely attract fewer participants than simple-contribution projects (Bonney et al., 2009). However, projects in which citizens are active participants throughout the research process should have several benefits over projects with simple contributions including participants gaining a deeper understanding of the process of science (Brossard et al., 2005; Trumbull et al., 2005) and the research product benefiting from greater innovation and context as a result of the diversity of participants’ backgrounds and ways of thinking. The organizers of the Open Dinosaur Project (the first three authors of this manuscript) designed the project to be open and transparent throughout the entire scientific process, from question formulation to data collection to analyses to open access publication (Farke et al., 2009). Citizen scientists (the rest of the authors) from diverse backgrounds and locations joined the project and contributed at least to data collection and often also to analysis, interpretation, writing, etc. Burgelman et al. (2010) predicted the lines between professional and amateur contributions to science will blur in the future; we suggest that this blurring is happening now, and our project is an example of it.

    REFERENCES:
    Bonney R, Cooper CB, Dickinson J, Kelling S, Phillips T, Rosenberg KV, Shirk J (2009) Citizen science: a developing tool for expanding science knowledge and scientific literacy. BioScience, 59, 977-984.
    Brossard D, Lewenstein B, Bonney R (2005) Scientific knowledge and attitude change: the impact of a citizen science project. International Journal of Science Education, 27, 1099-1121.
    Burgelman J-C, Osimo D, Bogdanowicz M (2010) Science 2.0 (change will happen …). First Monday, 15, 7.
    Evans C, Abrams E, Reitsma R, Roux K, Salmonsen L, Marra PP (2005) The Neighborhood Nestwatch Program: Participant outcomes of a citizen-science ecological research project. Conservation Biology, 19, 589-594.
    Farke AA, Alf RM, Taylor MP, Wedel MJ (2009) Sharing: public databases combat mistrust and secrecy. Nature, 461, 1053.
    Hand E (2010) People power. Nature, 466, 685-687.
    Krebs V (2010) Motivations of cybervolunteers in an applied distributed computing environment: MalariaControl.net as an example. First Monday, 15, (2).
    Lakshminarayanan S (2007) Using citizens to do science versus citizens as scientists. Ecology and Society, 12, r2.
    Lawrence A (2009) The first cuckoo in winter: phenology, recording, credibility and meaning in Britain. Global Environmental Change, 19, 173-179.
    Silvertown J (2009) A new dawn for citizen science. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 24, 467-471.
    Stodden V (2010) Open science: policy implications for the evolving phenomenon of user-led scientific innovation. Journal of Science Communication, 9, A05.
    Trumbull DJ, Bonney R, Bascom D, Cabral A (2000) Thinking scientifically during participation in a citizen-science project. Science Education, 84, 265-275.
    Trumbull DJ, Bonney R, Grudens-Schuck N (2005) Developing materials to promote inquiry: lessons learned. Science Education, 89, 879-900.

  15. William Miller
    December 3, 2010 at 7:57 am

    Looks very good; I agree that the ODP is unique in how open the analysis stuff is. (Things like Galaxy Zoo and Stardust@home have *some* role in analysis; but it’s still an order of magnitude more closed than this.)

    You might want to mention the Christmas Bird Count as probably the first in the modern lineage of citizen science projects. Perhaps adding to the second sentence “A growing number of scientific projects rely upon contributions from non-professionals; while this goes back at least to the Christmas Bird Count begun in 1900, the number of such projects has increased greatly in recent years” — just for a bit of historical background. Or maybe that’s unnecessary; just suggesting.

    Secondly, a nitpick: the link doesn’t work: it’s http://www.galaxyzoo.org/

  16. January 11, 2011 at 3:56 pm

    Hi folks,

    A new paper just came out that may relate to our general confidence in macroevolutionary conclusions from the dinosaur fossil record.

    Tarver et al. 2011. Is evolutionary history repeatedly rewritten in light of new fossil discoveries? Proc R Soc Lond B 278:599-604.
    Abstract available at:

    http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/278/1705/599.abstract?etoc

    Basically, it suggests that the dinosaur fossil record is abundant for some taxa but rare for others, so finding new fossils of some under-represented groups can challenge existing understanding of dinosaur phylogenetic relationships and inspire new phylogenetic trees that can be fairly different from previous trees. At least that’s what the abstract says, so hopefully it’s what the paper says too. :)

    And thanks, William, for your comments on the paragraph I wrote. Special thanks for picking up on my link typo.

    Jay

  17. John Dziak
    January 31, 2011 at 6:28 pm

    Perhaps useful by way of comparison:
    Gatsey, S.M. (1990). “Caudofemoral musculature and the evolution of theropod locomotion”. Paleobiology 16(2):170–186

  18. April 13, 2011 at 6:35 pm

    A news item just came out in Nature on digital repositories for fossil data. It advocates greater use of online data repositories for palaeontology. It is associated with the website http://supportpalaeodataarchiving.co.uk/?q=node/2. This closely aligns with the ODP’s message I think (we had to do our work because the bone data were not readily available in databases).

    Callaway, E. 2011. Fossil data enter the web period. Nature 472: 150.

  19. Ian Corfe
    May 26, 2011 at 2:35 pm

    The paper ‘Blackawton bees’ (P. S. Blackawton et al 2011 – Biol. Lett. published online 22 December 2010 doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2010.1056) would make a nice addition to the ‘Citizen Science’ paragraph, as it fulfils pretty much all the requirements of a ‘true’ citizen science project, being led by schoolchildren!

    Ian

  20. Bruce Woollatt
    June 21, 2011 at 4:00 pm

    I know I’m a little late to the party, but here goes.

    A couple of ceratopsian manus papers

    : A reevaluation of the manus structure in Triceratops (Ceratopsia: Ceratopsidae)
    Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology
    Volume 29, Issue 4, 12 December 2009, Pages 1136 – 1147
    Author: Shin-Ichi Fujiwara

    Habitual Locomotor Behavior Inferred from Manual Pathology in Two Late Cretaceous Chasmosaurine Ceratopsid Dinosaurs, Chasmosaurus irvinensis (CMN 41357) and Chasmosaurus belli (ROM 843) \ Elizabeth Rega, Robert Holmes, and Alex Tirabasso in New Perspectives on Horned Dinosaurs
    The Royal Tyrrell Museum Ceratopsian Symposium
    Edited by Michael J. Ryan, Brenda J. Chinnery-Allgeier, and David A. Eberth

    From what I can tell, these two papers come to different conclusions about the ceratopsian manus and I’m no sure which is correct.

  1. December 3, 2010 at 3:41 am
  2. May 25, 2011 at 11:42 pm

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: